Part 1 | Choose the right pot or vessel for your plants with these styling tips!

01   TO CACHE OR NOT TO CACHE?

Everyone has probably owned a terracotta pot, but there are many more materials being used to hold plants nowadays: ceramic, stoneware, fibreglass, seagrass - even washable paper bags. The options are endless. 

When you are choosing a pot for a new plant, think about how you are going to use it. Check the size of the plastic container your plant has come in then look for a new pot that will fit it. You can either plant directly into the new pot, or keep the plant in the plastic container and use the new pot as a cache-pot (a decorative container that holds a plant pot). If you're going to plant directly into the new pot, let the plant settle into your home for a couple of weeks before doing so - repotting too soon may send your plant into shock and kill it. The best time to repot is during the start of the plant's active growth period, which is generally in spring.

Also, only ever increase your pot size by two inches width and/or depth at a time - a pot that's too big gives the roots too much space to grow into. The plant won't grow above the soil until its roots begin to fill the container. An oversized pot can also hold excessive amounts of water and cause root rot. 

Below | IVY MUSE 'Cloud Pot' and 'Halo (White/Small)'


Below | IVY MUSE Nest in 'Brass & Clover Eggshell' and 'White & Feather Grey'

02   DRAINAGE - IS IT A MUST?

It's a good idea to use a drip tray when you have a pot with drainage holes. This will catch any drips and also allows you to water the plant without having to move it to the sink or put it outside. Drip trays can be hidden inside larger pots or put on display as a design feature. Empty any excess water from the tray.

Some plants can survive without drainage and - given the array of beautifully designed vessels that are available - you might be tempted to go that way. If you've decided to put a plant into a pot without drainage holes, be careful with your watering. Only let a little bit of water in at a time and keep it to a minimum. If there is too much water, tip the pot on its side to drain. The last thing you want to do is drown your plant.

Another option is to use self-watering pots, which have a well in their base to store water. These are great if you're a regular traveller or a bit forgetful.

Below | Leaf & Thread 'Self-Watering Planter (Slate)'



Below | Mr Kitly 'Self-Watering Planters'

WANT MORE HANDY TIPS ON HOW TO CREATE YOUR OWN GREEN OASIS?
 
 
Ferns are back in the bathroom, cacti are sitting on plant stands and devil's ivy is cascading from hangers. Indoor plants are the ultimate indoor accessory. Softening interiors and readily available, they are a stylist's best friend. However, it's their power to transform a sterile space into an urban sanctuary that makes them more than just an inanimate prop - all you need to know is how to use them.
 
From the founders of coveted plant-wares label, IVY MUSE, comes this charming guide on how to turn your home into a jungle-like retreat. With design-savvy tips and expert advise, you'll learn all there is to know about decorating with plants and botanical styling plus the necessities like light requirements and when to water and feed. From bathroom to boudoir to every room in between, create your very own green oasis with Plant Style.

PURCHASE PLANT STYLE: HOW TO GREENIFY YOUR SPACE HERE